Information on Lax-flowered Sea-lavender

Common Name: Lax-flowered Sea-lavender
Scientific Name: Limonium humile
Irish Name: Lus liath na mara
Family Group: Plumbaginaceae
Distribution: View Map (Courtesy of the BSBI)
Flowering Period


Click for list of all flowering by month
Lax-flowered Sea-lavender could sometimes be confused with:

Sea-lavender, Western, Sea-lavender, Rock,

On salt-marshes and seashores this pretty, papery wildflower blooms from July to September.  Its flowers are a lilac-lavender colour, each 6-7mm long, in lax clusters, the five-petalled flowers being loosely scattered along the stalks.  The untoothed leaves are narrow and long stalked. The seed heads remain on the plant throughout winter and are visited by hungry finches. It is a native plant belonging to the family Plumbaginaceae.  There are many variations on this and Limonium binoversum. The differences between these two plants are very subtle and I would have no problem whatsoever if anyone told me that this identification was incorrect.  Despite its name, it bears no relation to the Lavender or Lavandula family.  

I first found this plant on the Kenmare Estuary, Co Kerry in 1978 and the photographs were taken at  Saltmills, Co Wexford in 2005 and Bishop's Quarter, Co Clare in 2006. 

If you are satisfied you have correctly identified this plant, please submit your sighting to the National Biodiversity Data Centre

Sea-lavender, Lax-flowered
Sea-lavender, Lax-flowered

This is a species for which Ireland holds or possibly holds more than 25% of the European population (Ireland Red List No. 10 Vascular Plants)

There are several species of this plant grown in gardens and the sprays are frequently dried and used in wreaths and other floral arrangements.  Even after the petals fall off, the calyx remains and the flower is known as an 'everlasting flower'. These plants are known to gardeners as Statice – their appearance remaining static throughout their flowering period.